Call for Abstract

International Conference on Astrophysics and Particle Physics, will be organized around the theme “Collaborating Particle Physics and Astrophysics Concepts Towards Understanding the Mechanism of Universe”

Particle Physics 2016 is comprised of 18 tracks and 175 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Particle Physics 2016.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

With the development of rockets and the advances in electronics and other technologies in the 20th century, it became possible to send machines and animals and then people above Earth’s atmosphere into outer space. Well before technology made these achievements possible, however, space exploration had already captured the minds of many people, not only aircraft pilots and scientists but also writers and artists. In the 2000s, several plans for space exploration were announced; both government entities and the private sector have space exploration objectives. China has announced plans to have a 60-ton multi-module space station in orbit by 2020.

The NASA Authorization Act of 2010 provided a re-prioritized list of objectives for the American space program, as well as funding for the first priorities. NASA proposes to move forward with the development of the Space Launch System (SLS), which will be designed to carry the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, as well as important cargo, equipment, and science experiments to Earth's orbit and destinations beyond. Additionally, the SLS will serve as a back-up for commercial and international partner transportation services to the International Space Station. The SLS rocket will incorporate technological investments from the Space Shuttle program and the Constellation program in order to take advantage of proven hardware and reduce development and operations costs. The first developmental flight is targeted for the end of 2017. 

 

  • Track 1-1Theoretical astrophysics
  • Track 1-2Computational astrophysics
  • Track 1-3Observational astrophysics
  • Track 1-4Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics
  • Track 1-5Plasma astrophysics
  • Track 1-6Celestial Mechanics
  • Track 1-7Stellar Formation and Evolution
  • Track 1-8Plasma astrophysics
  • Track 1-9Advanced research in astrophysics
  • Track 1-10Spaceflight and Satellites
  • Track 1-11Robotic Space Exploration
  • Track 1-12Observation and Exploration of Planets
  • Track 1-13Recent and Future Developments

The visible universe-including Earth, the sun, other stars, and galaxies-is made of protons, neutrons, and electrons bundled together into atoms. Perhaps one of the most surprising discoveries of the 20th century was that this ordinary, or baryonic, matter makes up less than 5 percent of the mass of the universe. The rest of the universe appears to be made of a mysterious, invisible substance called dark matter (25 percent) and a force that repels gravity known as dark energy (70 percent). Scientists have a few ideas for what dark matter might be. One leading hypothesis is that dark matter consists of exotic particles that don't interact with normal matter or light but that still exert a gravitational pull. Dark energy is even more mysterious, and its discovery in the 1990s was a complete shock to scientists. Previously, physicists had assumed that the attractive force of gravity would slow down the expansion of the universe over time. But when two independent teams tried to measure the rate of deceleration, they found that the expansion was actually speeding up. One scientist likened the finding to throwing a set of keys up in the air expecting them to fall back down-only to see them fly straight up toward the ceiling.

  • Track 2-1Baryonic and Nonbaryonic Dark Matter
  • Track 2-2Cold dark matter, warm dark matter, hot dark matter and mixed dark matter
  • Track 2-3Scalar field dark matter
  • Track 2-4Self-interacting dark matter
  • Track 2-5Effect of dark energy
  • Track 2-6Implications for the fate of the universe
  • Track 2-7Detection experiments

Our universe is both ancient and vast, and expanding out farther and faster every day. This accelerating universe, the dark energy that seems to be behind it and other puzzles like the exact nature of the Big Bang and the early evolution of the universe are among the great puzzles of cosmology. Dramatic advances in observational cosmology since the 1990s, including the cosmic microwave background, distant supernovae and galaxy redshift surveys, have led to the development of a standard model of cosmology. This model requires the universe to contain large amounts of dark matter and dark energy whose nature is currently not well understood, but the model gives detailed predictions that are in excellent agreement with many diverse observations.

  • Track 3-1Formation and Interaction of Galaxies
  • Track 3-2Energy of the Cosmos
  • Track 3-3Gamma Ray Bursts, Supernovae and Other Transients
  • Track 3-4Particle Physics in Cosmology
  • Track 3-5Cosmic Microwave Background
  • Track 3-6Perturbation theory
  • Track 3-7Cosmochemistry

Modern particle physics research is focused on subatomic particles, including atomic constituents such as electrons, protons, and neutrons (protons and neutrons are composite particles called baryons, made of quarks), produced by radioactive and scattering processes, such as photons, neutrinos, and muons, as well as a wide range of exotic particles. Dynamics of particles is also governed by quantum mechanics; they exhibit wave–particle duality, displaying particle-like behaviour under certain experimental conditions and wave-like behaviour in others. In more technical terms, they are described by quantum state vectors in a Hilbert space, which is also treated in quantum field theory. Following the convention of particle physicists, the term elementary particle is applied to those particles that are, according to current understanding, presumed to be indivisible and not composed of other particles. Nuclear physics is the field of physics that studies the constituents and interactions of atomic nuclei. The most commonly known applications of nuclear physics are nuclear power generation and nuclear weapons technology, but the research has provided application in many fields, including those in nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, ion implantation in materials engineering, and radiocarbon dating in geology and archaeology.

 

  • Track 4-1The Baryon Assymetry of the Universe
  • Track 4-2Production of particle in the universe with different properties
  • Track 4-3The Standard Model of Elementary Particles
  • Track 4-4Physics of Particles and Radiation Detection
  • Track 4-5Acceleration Mechanisms

We are educated some further things about the cosmos beyond the solar system by sighting cosmic rays, which are mostly prepared of either atomic nuclei minus their orbiting electrons, or one of their basic components, protons. But these positively charged particles don’t point to their place of origin due to the magnetic fields of our galaxy which affect their flight paths like a magnet affects iron filings. The total number of elementary particles in the cosmos, and these neutral weakly interacting particles arisen to us almost without any trouble straight from their sources, traveling at very close to the speed of light. A with low energy of neutrino in flight would not notice a barrier of lead 50 light years thick. When we are able to see out in neutrino light we will undoubtedly get a amazing new view of the universe.

 

  • Track 5-1Neutrinos in the Universe
  • Track 5-2Stellar Neutrinos
  • Track 5-3Supernovae
  • Track 5-4High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos
  • Track 5-5High Energy Neutrino Telescopes
  • Track 5-6Implications for the Fate of the Universe
  • Track 5-7Neutrino in nuclear physics
  • Track 5-8Detection experiments

The Higgs boson is an elementary particle in the Standard Model of particle physics. It is the quantum excitation of the Higgs field

 

  • Track 6-1The Higgs System
  • Track 6-2Constraints on Higgs Boson Properties
  • Track 6-3Higgs Bosons in the Minimal Supersymmemetric Model
  • Track 6-4Producing the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson
  • Track 6-5Electroweak Baryogenesis
  • Track 6-6Detecting the Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons
  • Track 7-1Atomic physics
  • Track 7-2Molecular physics
  • Track 7-3Electromagnetic spectrum
  • Track 7-4Molecules and Photons – Spectroscopy and Collisions
  • Track 7-5Lasers, light beams and light pulses
  • Track 7-6Atoms in External Fields
  • Track 7-7Diatomic molecules
  • Track 7-8Basics of atomic collision physics: elastic processes
  • Track 7-9Electron impact excitation and ionization
  • Track 7-10The Density Matrix
  • Track 7-11Optical BLOCH Equations

Particle physics is the study of nature of the particles that institute matter and radiation. It deals with very small objects. Particle physics deals with the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. In the past several decades a huge amount of experimental information has been gathered, and many patterns and methodical features have been observed.

 

  • Track 8-1Particle Physics Phenomenology
  • Track 8-2Standard Model
  • Track 8-3Electroweak theory
  • Track 8-4Lattice Field Theory
  • Track 8-5Supersymmetry
  • Track 8-6Grand Unification Theory
  • Track 8-7Elementary particle
  • Track 8-8Antimatter
  • Track 8-9Vacuum Energy
  • Track 8-10Cosmic rays for particle and astroparticle physics
  • Track 8-11Statistical methods in particle physics experiments
  • Track 8-12Monte carlo particle physics software
  • Track 8-13Quarks and Hadrons
  • Track 8-14Space–Time Symmetries
  • Track 8-15Experimental Methods

Observational astronomy is one of the classifications of the astronomical science that is related with recording data, in contrast with Theoretical astrophysics, which is mainly concerned with finding out the measurable implications of physical models. It is the practice of observing celestial objects by using telescopes and other astronomical apparatus. Radio astronomy is the branch of Astronomy which studies celestial bodies at Radio Frequencies. Infrared astronomy is the division of astronomy and astrophysics that studies astronomical objects visible in infrared (IR) radiation only. Optical Astronomy is also called as Visible Light Astronomy. Ultraviolet astronomy is the observation of electromagnetic radiation at ultraviolet wavelengths similarly X-ray Astronomy uses X-rays and Gamma ray Astronomy uses Gamma rays

Sky surveys and mappings of the various wavelength bands of electromagnetic radiation have yielded much information on the content and character of the universe's structure. The organization of structure appears to follow as a hierarchical model with organization up to the scale of super clusters and filaments.

 

  • Track 9-1Standard model in Particle physics
  • Track 9-2Beams in Particle Accelerator
  • Track 9-3Heavy Charged-Particle Spectroscopy
  • Track 9-4Quantum Information Science
  • Track 9-5Hilbert Space
  • Track 9-6Einstein Field Equations
  • Track 9-7Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle
  • Track 9-8Computational Particle Physics
  • Track 9-9Cosmic Rays for Particle and Astroparticle Physics
  • Track 9-10Statistical Methods in Particle Physics Experiments
  • Track 9-11Monte Carlo Particle Physics Software
  • Track 9-12Multiparticle Dynamics
  • Track 9-13Calorimeter in Particle Physics
  • Track 9-14Particle Radiation
  • Track 9-15Single-Particle Orbits
  • Track 9-16Superconducting Particle Detectors
With the development of rockets and the advances in electronics and other technologies in the 20th century, it became possible to send machines and animals and then people above Earth’s atmosphere into outer space. Well before technology made these achievements possible, however, space exploration had already captured the minds of many people, not only aircraft pilots and scientists but also writers and artists. In the 2000s, several plans for space exploration were announced; both government entities and the private sector have space exploration objectives. China has announced plans to have a 60-ton multi-module space station in orbit by 2020.
  • Track 10-1Neutrino oscillation
  • Track 10-2Neuro Science and Education
  • Track 10-3Neurophysics
  • Track 10-4Neutrino-less double beta decay
  • Track 10-5Solar Neutrinos
  • Track 10-6Detection of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos

Physics of the early Universe is at the boundary of astronomy and philosophy since we do not currently have a complete theory that unifies all the fundamental forces of Nature at the moment of Creation. In addition, there is no possibility of linking observation or experimentation of early Universe physics to our theories (i.e. it’s not possible to `build' another Universe). Our theories are rejected or accepted based on simplicity and aesthetic grounds, plus there power of prediction to later times, rather than an appeal to empirical results. This is a very difference way of doing science from previous centuries of research.

 

 

  • Track 11-1Spectroscopy
  • Track 11-2Astrometry
  • Track 11-3Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope
  • Track 11-4Kepler Telescope
  • Track 11-5Spitzer Space Telescope
  • Track 11-6James Webb Space Telescope
  • Track 11-7Hubble Space Telescope
  • Track 11-8Telescopes in Space Advantages
  • Track 11-9Stellar Spectroscopy

Nuclear physics and Particle Physics is the area of physics that studies atomic nuclei and their elements and interactions. The most commonly known kind of nuclear physics is nuclear power generation, the research has run to tenders in many fields, including nuclear medication and magnetic reverberation imaging, nuclear weapons, ion implantation in materials engineering, and radiocarbon dating in geology and archaeology.

 

  • Track 12-1Basic Properties of Atomic Nuclei
  • Track 12-2Sources of Relativistic and Ultrarelativistic Nuclei
  • Track 12-3Detection Technique
  • Track 12-4Fragmentation Process
  • Track 12-5Hadronic Femtoscopy
  • Track 12-6Charmonium Suppression
  • Track 12-7Production and Absorption of Jets

The experimental particle physics is to study the fundamental constituents of matter and their interaction. These activities are carried out in teamwork with international laboratories, where fundamental physics results are obtained. To study further, it is developing future detector technologies for experimentation, and computer grids for analysis of data.

 

  • Track 13-1Experimental Nuclear physics
  • Track 13-2Theoritical Nuclear physics
  • Track 13-3Nuclear Fusion
  • Track 13-4Nuclear Decay
  • Track 13-5Nuclear Fission
  • Track 13-6Nuclear Science
  • Track 13-7Effective Field Theory
  • Track 13-8Elementary Particle
  • Track 13-9Weak Interactions: Quarks And Leptons
  • Track 13-10Weak Interactions: Electroweak Unification
  • Track 13-11Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking
  • Track 13-12Collective Motion and Phase Transitions in Nuclear Systems
  • Track 13-13Chiral Nuclear Dynamics
  • Track 13-14Exploring Fundamental Issues in Nuclear Physics

Gravitational physicists explore the implications of the general theory of relativity, in which gravitation is a consequence of the curvature of space and time. This curvature thus controls the motion of inertial objects. Modern research in gravitational physics includes studying applications of numerical relativity, black hole dynamics, sources of gravitational radiation, critical phenomena in gravitational collapse, the initial value problem of general relativity, and relativistic astrophysics. The works of Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein dominate the development of gravitational theory. Newton’s classical theory of gravitational force held sway from his Principia, published in 1687, until Einstein’s work in the early 20th century. Newton’s theory is sufficient even today for all but the most precise applications. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts only minute quantitative differences from the Newtonian theory except in a few special cases. The major significance of Einstein’s theory is its radical conceptual departure from classical theory and its implications for further growth in physical thought.

 

  • Track 14-1Nucleosynthesis
  • Track 14-2Bing bang Nucleosynthesis
  • Track 14-3Nuclear Astrophysics with Small Accelerators
  • Track 14-4Stellar Basics of Nuclear Astrophysics
  • Track 14-5Hydrogen Burning Advanced Stellar
  • Track 14-6Evolution, Supernovae and Gamma-ray Bursters

It is the field where particle physics, astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology meet: Particle physics deals with the study of the close structure of matter and the fundamental laws that govern their connections, e.g. the physics of the smallest scale of the Cosmos. Astronomy and astrophysics, study the structure of the Universe and its evolution from the early Big Bang. It is cosmology that links the theory of particle physics with that of the very early Universe. It aims at important issues extending from origin of the universe and the nature of gravity to the understanding of dark matter and dark energy.

 

  • Track 15-1Newtons law of Universal Gravitation
  • Track 15-2Galaxy and Gravity
  • Track 15-3Gravitational Radiation
  • Track 15-4Gravitational Singularity
  • Track 15-5Black Holes and Gravitational Waves
  • Track 15-6Sources of Gravitational Radiation
  • Track 15-7Critical Phenomena in Gravitational Collapse
  • Track 15-8The Initial Value Problem of General Relativity
  • Track 15-9Relativistic Astrophysics
  • Track 15-10Applications of Numerical Relativity
  • Track 15-11Gravitoelectromagnetism
  • Track 15-12Elusive gravity

The visible universe-including Earth, the sun, other stars, and galaxies-is made of protons, neutrons, and electrons bundled together into atoms. Perhaps one of the most surprising discoveries of the 20th century was that this ordinary, or baryonic, matter makes up less than 5 percent of the mass of the universe. The rest of the universe appears to be made of a mysterious, invisible substance called dark matter (25 percent) and a force that repels gravity known as dark energy (70 percent). Scientists have a few ideas for what dark matter might be. One leading hypothesis is that dark matter consists of exotic particles that don't interact with normal matter or light but that still exert a gravitational pull. Dark energy is even more mysterious, and its discovery in the 1990s was a complete shock to scientists. Previously, physicists had assumed that the attractive force of gravity would slow down the expansion of the universe over time. But when two independent teams tried to measure the rate of deceleration, they found that the expansion was actually speeding up. One scientist likened the finding to throwing a set of keys up in the air expecting them to fall back down-only to see them fly straight up toward the ceiling.

  • Track 16-1The Electromagnetic zero-point field
  • Track 16-2Ancient astronomy
  • Track 16-3Big bang theory
  • Track 16-4Timeline of the big bang
  • Track 16-5Hadron epoch, lepton epoch and photon epoch
  • Track 16-6Cosmic calendar
  • Track 16-7Oscillating model
  • Track 16-8Timeline of the far future
  • Track 16-9Ultimate fate of the universe
  • Track 16-10Solar astronomy
  • Track 16-11Planetary science
  • Track 16-12Stellar astronomy
  • Track 16-13Galactic astronomy
  • Track 16-14Extragalactic astronomy
  • Track 16-15Advanced software in astronomy
  • Track 16-16Astrodynamics
  • Track 16-17Archaeoastronomy
  • Track 16-18Astrostatistics
  • Track 16-19Astrochemistry
  • Track 16-20Forensic astronomy

Scientists are predicting a new age of astronomy with the discovery of the first sub-atomic neutrino particles from deep space, which could provide fresh insights into cosmic events in distant regions of the Universe such as exploding stars and black holes.

  • Track 17-1Meteorite and Comet Chemistry
  • Track 17-2Plantery Chemistry
  • Track 17-3Charged Particle Chemistry

The clear and common top importance was to get all the vast science.  The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started in 2015 and collide beams at close to its design energy of 14 TeV. The fact that we already achieved to discover the Higgs boson with beams colliding at 7 and 8 TeV is a great success. The LHC can continue delivering amazing physics from the energy frontier for two more decades.

 

  • Track 18-1Particle Radiation
  • Track 18-2Large hadron collider
  • Track 18-3Characterization of the higgs boson
  • Track 18-4Cern after the lhc
  • Track 18-5A linear electron-positron collider
  • Track 18-6Supersymmetry and zero-point fields
  • Track 18-7Neutrinos
  • Track 18-8Electrostatic and linear particle accelerators
  • Track 18-9Microwave background horizon problem
  • Track 18-10The Angular Momentum/Mass Relation