Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Astrophysics and Particle Physics Dallas, Texas, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Atomic and Molecular Astrophysics | Neutrino Physics | Heavy-ion physics | Gravitational physics
Location: Plano - Richardson (A)
Speaker

Chair

Hongbo Cheng

East China University of Science and Technology, China

Speaker

Co-Chair

John G Bryant

University Paris VI, France

Session Introduction

Irene Di Palma

Universitá di Roma La Sapienza, Italy

Title: Detection of gravitational waves with LIGO

Time : 09:00-09:25

Speaker
Biography:

Irene Di Palma has completed her studies in Astrophysics from the University of Rome La Sapienza, a Fellowship at the Columbia University of New York and her PhD from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover. After the first Post-doctoral studies from the Max Planck in Golm, Berlin, she is now a Researcher at the University of Rome, La Sapienza. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

In February 2016, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration reported the detection of gravitational waves produced from the inspiral and merger of two stellar mass black holes. In addition to being the first direct measurement of a gravitational wave by an earth-based detector, this is the first observation of a coalescing binary black hole system, the first evidence that “heavy” stellar mass black holes exist, and the first test of general relativity in the strong-field regime. Successively, in June the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations announced that the same instruments have caught a second robust signal from two black holes in their final orbits and then their coalescence into a single black hole. With these two confirmed detections, along with a third likely detection made in October 2015 (believed also to be caused by a pair of merging black holes) we can now start to estimate the rate of black hole coalescences in the Universe based not on theory, but on real observations.

Speaker
Biography:

John Morrison has received his PhD in Physics from Johns Hopkins University. After working as a Research Associate at the Argonne Laboratory, he moved to Sweden where he received a number of grants from the Swedish Research Council to build a research group in Theoretical Atomic Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. His research in Sweden led to the publication of the monograph “Atomic Many-body Theory”, which originally appear as volume 13 of the Springer series. The second edition of the book, which was published as volume 3 of the Springer Series on Atoms and Plasmas, has become a Springer classic. He has worked as a Faculty Member in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Louisville, where he continues to carry on research in Atomic and Molecular Physics. The second edition of his recent textbook, “Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers” (Elsevier, 2015), is based on his teaching of Modern Physics and Quantum.

Abstract:

A summary will be given of various approaches that can be used for doing numerical Hartree-Fock and many-body calculations on atoms and molecules. The theoretical approaches considered include the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method and many-body perturbation theory. For light atoms and molecules, more than 98 percent of the correlation energy is due to pair excitations. Because molecules lack spherical symmetry, Schrodinger-like equations for molecules typically involve many more independent variables. While, the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms involve a single radial variable and the two-electron pair equation for atoms involve two radial variables, the Hartree-Fock equations for diatomic molecules involves two independent variables and the pair equation for diatomic molecules involve independent variables. To deal with these problems of higher-dimensionality, my mathematical collaborators and I have developed numerical methods for dividing the variable space into smaller sub-regions in which the equations can be solved independently. This domain de-composition theory is described and numerical results are given for Hartree-Fock calculations for diatomic molecules and for numerical solutions of the first-order pair equations which can be used to evaluate the Goldstone diagrams that arise in many-body calculations of molecular spectra. The goal of our calculations is to describe the energy of two helium atoms approaching each other in a cold atomic collision and to obtain the spectral fingerprints of CO and OH molecules in planetary atmospheres.

Speaker
Biography:

Jose F Valdés-Galicia has dedicated most of his career to create and consolidate a group on experimental Cosmic Ray Physics. He is the PI of a Neutron Monitor and a Muon Telescope operating continuously since 1990 at the National University Campus in Mexico City. He has produced many papers on Cosmic Ray Variations caused by solar activity; in that field his group discovered the 1.6y cosmic ray variation (Valdés-Galicia et al, 1996) that opened the path for a new research line on cosmic ray mid-term variations. He is a Member of the Pierre Auger Collaboration operating an observatory in Argentina dedicated to Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays.

Abstract:

An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 on the solar surface at 16:06 U on July 8, 2014. In association with the flare, two neutron detectors located at high mountain locations, Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico and Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, recorded two neutron pulses, separated approximately by 30 min. Moreover, enhancements were also observed by the solar neutron detector onboard the International Space Station. We analyzed these data and contrasted them with solar images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the existing evidence, we noticed that the production mechanism of neutrons cannot be explained by a single model; at least one of the enhancements can be explained by an electric field generated by the collision of magnetic loops and the other by the shock acceleration mechanism at the front side of the CME.

Wan-Zhe Feng

Northeastern University, USA

Title: Baryogenesis and Dark Matter in U(1) Extensions

Time : 10:15-10:40

Biography:

Wan-Zhe Feng has completed his PhD from Northeastern University and Post-doctoral studied from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Max-Planck Institute for Physics at Munich.

Abstract:

Three of the important puzzles in cosmology relate to the origin of baryon asymmetry in the Universe, the nature of dark matter and the cosmic coincidence that the amount of dark matter and visible matter are comparable. In this talk, I will discuss about the classes of models where baryon asymmetry and dark matter have a common origin within the framework of U extensions of the standard model and of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In one model all of the fundamental interactions do not violate lepton number, and the total B-L in the Universe vanishes, which is quite different from previous mechanisms that baryon or lepton number are violated in generating the matter and anti-matter asymmetry. In addition, one may also generate a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses and mixings in conformity with the current data from Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:40-11:00 @ Foyer

Hongbo Cheng

East China University of Science and Technology, China

Title: The calculation of the thermodynamic quantities of the Bardeen black hole

Time : 11:00-11:25

Speaker
Biography:

Hongbo Cheng has completed his PhD from East China University of Science and Technology. He is a Professor in the Department of Physics in East China University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

We compute the series of thermodynamic quantities such as local temperature, heat capacity and free energy of Bardeen black hole to explore its thermodynamic properties that subject to the horizon and charge of this kind of black hole. For the sufficiently high temperature, the black hole with large horizon radius survives. Only tiny black holes and huge ones have positive heat capacity, which lead to stable black holes. We also discuss the thermodynamic characteristics associated with the charge to check the existence and stability of the Bardeen black hole. The black holes involving the large charge can remain stable; although their sizes are not extremely small or extremely large. The influence from the charge of Bardeen black hole on its critical temperature, heat capacity and free energy is obvious and distinct. There may be more black holes with magnetic charge than in the case of vanishing charge within a region of local temperature. If the local temperature becomes high enough, only large black holes will emerge, no matter whether they have magnetic charge or not. The black holes without magnetic charge cannot exist stably unless they are huge.

John G Bryant

Université Paris VI, France

Title: Properties and applications of the modified Kepler problem

Time : 11:25-11:50

Speaker
Biography:

John G Bryant completed his thesis (Doctorat d'Etat) on Contact Systems in Mechanics in 1983 at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI). He has held academic positions at the Université de Franche Comté (France) and UAM University (Mexico City). His publications include papers on the symmetries of Hamiltonian Systems, and the Reformulation of the N-Body Problem. He is currently retired but still active in research, having recently written a book on the Universal N-Body Problem.

Abstract:

The classical Kepler problem gives a very good description of planetary motion, but is not realistic when the distance approaches zero (because the velocity becomes unbounded), and does not extend to the motion of massless particles (even though light is deflected by gravity). We show that it is possible to extend the Kepler problem by defining a new Hamiltonian for the problem where the velocity is always less than the velocity of light c, and even goes to zero when approaching collision; and also the motion of massless particles can be realistically described since it obeys Fermat's principle of least time. At the same time, Kepler's three famous laws governing planetary motion are equally well accounted. We then describe some non-classical properties of the motion, such as the existence of a new type of hyperbolic motion, which we call super-hyperbolic motion, characterized by a velocity that is always increasing with the distance (contrary to classical hyperbolic motion, whose velocity is always decreasing ), and which corresponds to the motion of very high energy objects. As it turns out, the gravitational action is repulsive in this case as well as in the case of collision and near-collisions motions. And most remarkably, the motion of massless particles is always repulsive. Finally, we indicate briefly how this generalization of the Kepler problem can be extended to the N-Body problem where, as before, the velocities are always bounded, and the motion of massless particles can be realistically described.

Е А Kotikov

B P Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russia

Title: Investigation of fragmentation (Z=2) of relativistic nuclei 16О and 208Pb

Time : 11:50-12:15

Biography:

Е А Kotikov is a Researcher at B P Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute from Russia. His areas of interest are Fragmentation Process and Structure of Nuclei. He has published many papers in various reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

The angular distributions of doubly charged fragments of a nucleus 16О with the momentum 4.5А GeV c-1 and 208Pb with the momentum 160А GeV c-1 during their interaction with photoemulsion nuclei were studied. Contrary to common belief that fragmentation of relativistic nuclei in a wide range of masses and energy conforms to the statistical model, the experimental angular distributions of doubly charged fragments of these nuclei are not described by this model. The mechanisms of fragmentation of the oxygen nuclei can at least be assumed based on angle measurements and visual observation of all events of their inelastic interactions with emulsion nuclei. The lead nuclei fragmentation is associated with much more numerous processes. But it is not possible to identify them using the angular measurements only.

Youngsub Yoon

Seoul National University, South Korea

Title: Approximation of the naive black hole degeneracy

Time : 12:15-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Youngsub Yoon has received his Bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 2010 and Master’s degree from Seoul National University in 2016. He currently resides in Daejeon, South Korea. 

Abstract:

Loop quantum gravity predicts that the area is quantized as the area operator only admits discrete eigenvalues. In 1996, Rovelli suggested a connection between the black hole entropy and the area spectrum; the number of ways in which the area of the black hole horizon can be expressed as the sum of the unit areas (i.e. area eigenvalues) is the black hole degeneracy. In this talk, I will calculate the black hole degeneracy (i.e. the exponential of black hole entropy) by using Rovelli’s idea. However, it is now widely believed in loop quantum grvity community that Rovelli’s picture of black hole entropy is not the complete answer, as one has to further impose an extra condition. The word “naive” in the naive black hole degeneracy means that this extra condition is not considered; I only use Rovelli’s idea. However, it may be possible that the naive black hole degeneracy is the real black hole degeneracy (i.e. that we do not need to take the extra condition) as I showed in another paper of mine with Brian Kong.

Celso Franco

LIP, Portugal

Title: COMPASS results on the nucleon spin structure

Time : 12:30-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Celso Franco has graduated in Physics from the University of Lisbon in 2005 and has completed his PhD degree in Experimental Particle Physics from the Technical University of Lisbon in 2011. During the PhD, he has worked in the highly competitive scientific environment of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Currently, he works as a Post-doctorate fellow for the COMPASS and HADES experiments. He is co-author of 47 articles published in peer review journals and is single author of 9 conference proceedings. His h-index is 21. In 2016, he was nominated for the Altarelli prize for Junior Scientist.

Abstract:

The COMPASS experiment at CERN is one of the leading experiments studying the nucleon spin structure. These studies are being carried on since 2002, by measuring hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of 160 GeV/c and 200 GeV/c polarized muons off different polarized targets. One of the main goals is to determine how the total longitudinal spin projection of the nucleon, 1/2, is distributed among its constituents, quarks and gluons. Regarding this topic the latest results from COMPASS on the quark and gluon helicity will be shown. Another major goal, whose fulfillment is needed for a complete understanding of the nucleon structure, is the determination of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs). An overview of the TMD results from semi-inclusive DIS will also be presented. In 2015 COMPASS scattered a negative pion beam of 190 GeV/c off a transversely polarized proton target, with the goal of accessing the TMDs of both hadrons without any prior knowledge on fragmentation functions. This was the first ever polarized Drell-Yan (DY) experiment with a pion beam. Since the DY data covers part of the DIS kinematic region, COMPASS has the unique opportunity to test the sign change of the Sivers TMD as predicted by QCD. This is a crucial test to the formalism of non-perturbative QCD. Preliminary results will be shown. Finally, the COMPASS plan to measure generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed. The first GPD run was taken in 2016.

Speaker
Biography:

Harold Blas has completed his PhD in 2000 from IFT-UNESP University (Sao Paulo-Brazil) and Postdoctoral studies from IFT-UNESP, IFSC-USP. He is a Professor of Physics, at the IF-UFMT. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and his research interests are Particle Physics and Mathematical Physics.          
 

Abstract:

Deformations of the focusing non-linear Schrodinger model (NLS) are considered in the context of the Quasi-integrability concept. We strengthen the results of JHEP09 (2012) 103 for bright soliton collisions. We addressed the focusing NLS as a complement to the one in JHEP03(2016)005, in which the modified defocusing NLS models with dark solitons were shown to exhibit an infinite tower of exactly conserved charges. We show, by means of analytical and numerical methods, that for certain two-bright-soliton solutions, in which the modulus and phase of the complex modified NLS field exhibit even parities under a space-reflection symmetry, the first four and the sequence of even order charges are exactly conserved during the scattering process of the solitons. We perform extensive numerical simulations and consider the bright solitons with deformed potential. However, for two-soliton field components without definite parity we also show numerically the vanishing of the first non-trivial anomaly and the exact conservation of the relevant charge. So, the parity symmetry seems to be a sufficient but not a necessary condition for the existence of the infinite tower of conserved charges. The model supports elastic scattering of solitons for a wide range of values of the amplitudes and parameters. Since the NLS equation is ubiquitous, our results may find potential applications in several areas of non-linear science.

Jerry I Jacobson

Institute of Theoretical Physics and Advanced Studies, USA

Title: Jacobson resonance: Inertial electromagnetic induction

Time : 12:55-13:05

Biography:

Jerry I Jacobson is an eminent expert in the field of Bioelectromagnetics, having pioneered research utilizing physiologic Pico Tesla magnetic fields in the treatment of a diversity of conditions. His discovery of Jacobson Resonance yielded a new, non-invasive technology prototyped and characterized by NASA engineers at the John C Stennis Space Center. As a world renowned Medical Physicist, he has lectured extensively, published more than 100 scientific articles in peer reviewed journals, and has invented 50 patents. He is currently the Chairman of the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Advanced Studies for Biophysical Research which has directed research at a dozen universities throughout the world for the past 20 years. Among his numerous biographical listings are: Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering, and Who’s Who in American Inventors. He is the Chief Science Officer for several biotech companies.

Abstract:

One of the criticisms of general relativity is that it does not explain the concept of inertia. Mach’s principle stated that the inertia of a body is somehow due to the presence of other bodies in the universe. If this is true, then it is most especially relevant to formulate an understanding of space, and its causal relation to matter. In this regard, we propose that introduction of biological models appertaining to space, quantum theory and relativity may be prerequisite for understanding the connection of space and matter, photons and phonons. A new particle-wave equation, mc2=BvLq, formulates the conceptual framework for inertial electromagnetic induction (IEMI), perhaps representing the initial physical mechanism for non-ionizing radiation (NIR) bio effects. Derived from standard formulae, a new insight is introduced to provide an innovative, physiologic and efficacious approach to magneto-therapy. Specific experimental reports are cited wherein the modeling and EMF parameters were dictated by theory. It is hypothesized that Jacobson Resonance Theory is the missing link that Einstein sought for unifying the fundamental forces of nature: the electromagnetic, gravitational and nuclear forces.

 

 

Wen Ying Li

Taiyuan University of Technology, China

Title: DFT study of the Ni particle size on CH4/CO2 reforming over Ni/MgO catalyst

Time : 13:05-13:15

Biography:

Wen-ying Li is a Coal Chemical Engineering from Taiyuan University of Technology, China and Distinguished Professor Cheung Kong Scholars Program. Her research field Coal Chemistry, Coal pyrolysis, Coal-based energy integration system. She completed her Ph.D. in 1995, Organic Chem. Eng., Dalian University of Technology, China, M.E. in 1992, Organic Chem. Eng., Taiyuan University of Technology, China and she completed her B.E. in 1989, Coal Chem. Eng., Taiyuan University of Technology, China. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.                                     

Abstract:

Carbon deposition, as the main cause of supported Ni catalysts in CH4/CO2 reforming, is sensitive to the metal Ni particle size. To explore what’s the reason of the particle size effect during the catalysis process, Ni clusters, Ni4, Ni8 and Ni12 which reflect the different cluster thicknesses supported on the MgO (100) slabs, have been adapted to simulate Ni/MgO catalysts. By using density functional theory (DFT), the reaction pathways of CH4/CO2 reforming on Nix/MgO (100) models are used to investigate the particle size that might affect the reaction pathway. The reforming mechanisms of CH4/CO2 on different Nix/MgO (100) indicate the energy barriers of CH4 dissociated adsorption, CH dissociation and C oxidation three factors are all declining with the decrease of the Ni cluster size. The Hirshfeld charges analyses of those three steps show only atoms of Nix cluster on bottom or second bottom layer can obtain electrons from the MgO supporter and the main electrons transferring are occurring between adsorbed species and the Ni atoms in surface layer. The Ni atoms of surface layer in small Ni cluster will have more electrons and have better catalytic activity. As a result, the NiO/MgO catalysts with small Ni particle would expose more Ni atoms in contact with the MgO supporter, which might be the reason of metal particle size effect.