Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Astrophysics and Particle Physics Dallas, Texas, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Edwin Zong

Laser Neutrino Annihilation Synergistic Applicator LLC, USA

Keynote: The planet Earth

Time : 09:00-09:30

OMICS International Particle Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Edwin Zong photo
Biography:

Edwin Zong has completed his Medical Degree from Shanghai University of Chinese Medicine and New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. He has completed his specialty training in Internal Medicine from KMC/University of California, Los Angeles. He is the Medical Director of Oasis Medical Group Inc. and Laser Neutrino Annihilation Synergistic Applicator LLC, USA. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The planet’s atmosphere plays a key role for heat preservation, while it is aff ected by planet’s mass and E/M fi eld. Th e world’s electric production has almost tripled in the last century. Along with Earth’s inherited motion, the electrifi cation of our home planet has increased its E/M fi eld, which causes global re-climate/gas retaining or warming. It is evidenced by the tremendous increase of the Earth’s lightning/storms in the past twenty years. Th e global warming is not about temperature or sea water upsurge. It is all about the accelerated water lost! It is evidenced with glaciers liquefying. Ice serves an essential H2O preservation by slowing its evaporating for any planets/asteroids. Our earth has already lost a quarter of its H2O. Th e current trend of our civilization is to accelerate rather than decelerate earth’s inevitable desertifi cation-a hastened suicidal process committed by humans to eradicate humans entirely. To save our oasis planet for next generation, I have envisioned a roadmap for cosmos reconstructive engineering known as “global and regional environment catastrophe prevention and restoration or GRE-CPR” which is frequently dubbed as “Earth CPR”. Earth CPR focuses on planet’s waste disposition and recycling. Similar to your hospital visit, a simple and straightforward physics/modern medicine has been developed to preserve oxygen and water for your malfunctioned organs. It is now a 911 calling for the birth of our new space industry for your dysfunctional planet.

Keynote Forum

John C Morrison

University of Louisville, USA

Keynote: Numerical Hartree-Fock and correlation calculations of the properties of diatomic molecules

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Particle Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker John C Morrison photo
Biography:

John C Morrison has received his PhD in Physics from Johns Hopkins University. After working as a Research Associate at the Argonne Laboratory, he moved to Sweden where he received a number of grants from the Swedish Research Council to build a research group in Theoretical Atomic Physics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. His research in Sweden led to the publication of the monograph Atomic Many-body Theory, which originally appear as volume 13 of the Springer series on Chemical Physics. The second edition of the book, which was published as volume 3 of the Springer series on Atoms and Plasmas, has become a Springer classic. Returning to USA in 1983, he obtained a Faculty Position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the University of Louisville where he continues to carry on research in Atomic and Molecular Physics. The second edition of his recent textbook, “Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers” (Elsevier, 2015), is based on his teaching of modern physics and quantum mechanics at University of Louisville. His research interests include Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics with applications particularly in Astrophysics.

Abstract:

A summary will be given of various approaches that can be used for doing first-principle calculations on atoms and molecules. The theoretical approaches considered include the multi-configuration Hartee-Fock method and many-body perturbation theory. Because molecules lack spherical symmetry, the orbital equations for molecules typically involve many more independent variables. While the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms involve a single radial variable and the two-electron pair equation for atoms involve two radial variables, the Hartree-Fock equations for diatomic molecules involves two independent variables and the pair equation for diatomic molecules involve five independent variables. To deal with these problems of higher-dimensionality, our mathematical collaborators have developed numerical methods for dividing the variable space into smaller sub-regions in which the equations can be solved independently. This domain decomposition theory is described and numerical results are given for Hartree-Fock calculations for diatomic molecules and for numerical solutions of the first-order pair equation, which can be used to evaluate the goldstone diagrams that arise in many-body calculations of molecular spectra. The goal of our calculations is to describe the energy levels and transition probabilities of diatomic molecules to a high level of accuracy. In our contributed paper in this conference, we will show how such methods can be used to calculate the energy of two helium atoms approaching each other in cold atomic collisions and to obtain the spectral fingerprints of CO and OH molecules in planetary atmospheres.

OMICS International Particle Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vasily Yu Belashov photo
Biography:

Vasily Yu Belashov has done his PhD (Radiophysics) and Doctor of Science (Physics and Mathematics). His main fields of research are: Theory and numerical simulation of the dynamics of multi-dimensional nonlinear waves, solitons and vortex structures in plasmas and other dispersive media. Currently, he is a Professor at the Kazan Federal University. He was the Coordinator of Studies for the International Program “Solar Terminator” (1987-1992), and took part in Programs WITS/WAGS and STEP. He is author of 288 publications and one book “Solitary Waves in Dispersive Complex Media”.

Abstract:

This paper is devoted to a one of the most interesting and rapidly developing areas of modern nonlinear physics and mathematics i.e. the theoretical, analytical and advanced numerical study of the structure and dynamics of two- and three-dimensional so­­li­tons and nonlinear waves described by Kadomtsev-Petviashvili, derivative nonlinear Schrodinger classes of equa­tions and also the vortex systems described by Euler-type equations. Special attention is paid to generalizations (relevant to various complex physical media) of these equations, accounting for high-order dispersion corrections, influence of dissipation, instabilities, and stochastic fluctuations of the wave fields. This is consistent representation of the both early known and new original results obtained by author and also some generalizations in theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear waves, solitons and vortex dynamics in dispersive media. On a le­vel with detail consideration of pure theoretical aspects, special attention is paid to the applications of the theory in different fields of modern physics including plasma physics (such as 2D and 3D ion-acoustic, fast magnetosonic and Alfven nonlinear wave structures and vortex dynamics), hydrodynamics (evolution of 2D nonlinear waves on shallow water with depth varying in space and time) and physics of the upper atmosphere (transformation of 2D internal gravity waves and traveling ionospheric disturbances in regions with sharp gradients of the parameters of medium).

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:30-10:50 @ Foyer
  • Astrophysics & Spacescience | Astronomy
Location: Plano - Richardson (A)
Speaker

Chair

Pierre Barge

LAM/Aix-Marseille University, France

Speaker

Co-Chair

Irene Di Palma

University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy

Session Introduction

Leonid Ksanfomality

Space Research Institute-RAS, Russia

Title: Comparison of some features of comets 1P/Halley and 67P/CG

Time : 10:50-11:15

Speaker
Biography:

Leonid Ksanfomality has completed his PhD from the Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory and Post-doctoral studies from the Space Research Institute, Moscow. He is the Main Researcher, Planetary Physics department at Space Research Institute, Moscow. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of scientific journals.

Abstract:

Direct study of cometary nuclei which began 30 years ago shows the diversity of origin processes, the nature of cometary bodies, their comas and the areas of their origin. It may be noted that the frequent assertion that the study of physics and evolution of comets speed up the study of fundamental questions about the origin of the solar system, is a bit naive. On contrary, it reveals all the new processes that complicate our notion on the origin of the solar system. Comparison of the most detailed studied comets, as comets 1P/Halley and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, points to significant differences in their physical and chemical properties, dynamics and evolution. Researches of their properties and shapes showed that part of the cometary nucleus may be a result of low-speed collisions of planetesimals. The hypothesis of the origin of the cometary nucleus as a result of collisions of planetesimals has long been known, but it is 67P/CG comet that gave it relevance. The report shows that in some cases the geometry of the cometary nucleus retains some information about processes of collision and allows finding the momentum of the impactor.

Pierre Barge

LAM/Aix-Marseille University, France

Title: Vortices in protoplanetary disks

Time : 11:15-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Pierre Barge integrated a permanent position in Astronomy in 1982 after a first thesis from Paris VII University; then he completed a PhD in 1991 from Marseille University. He was Chair of the Exoplanet Program of the CoRoT space mission from 1995 to 2009. He is now a Senior Astronomer from CNAP in Aix Marseille University. He has published more than 86 papers in refereed journals.

Abstract:

Large scale vortices in protoplanetary disks are thought to form and survive long enough to significantly change the global disk evolution. They can capture and concentrate the dust particles embedded in the gas possibly explaining asymmetries and dust concentrations recently observed at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The high-concentration regions formed by the vortices could be preferred sites of planet formation where agglomeration processes and gravitational instabilities could lead to primordial bodies like planetesimals or planetary embryos. I will first review the various possibilities to form robust vortices by the Rossby wave or the baroclinic instability in the case of non-stratified and stratified disks. Then, I will present the dust/vortex interaction and the trapping mechanism. Finally, I will discuss the evolution of the vortices once heavily loaded with dust particles and the possibility to form planetesimals.

Qiuhe Peng

Nanjing University, China

Title: An unifi ed model of supernova driven by magnetic monopoles

Time : 11:40-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Qiuhe Peng is mainly engaged in nuclear astrophysics, particle astrophysics and Galactic Astronomy research. In the field of Nuclear Astrophysics, his research project involved a neutron star (pulsar), the supernova explosion mechanism and the thermonuclear reaction inside the star, the synthesis of heavy elements and interstellar radioactive element such as the origin of celestial 26Al. In addition, through his lectures, he establishes Nuclear Astrophysics research in China, He was invited by Peking University, by Tsinghua University (both in Beijing and in Taiwan) and by nuclear physics institutes in Beijing, Shanghai, Lanzhou to give lectures on Nuclear Astrophysics for many times. He has participated in the international academic conferences over 40 times and he visited more than 20 countries. In 1994, he visited eight institutes in USA to give lectures. He is the first Chinese Astrophysicist to visit NASA and to give a lecture on the topic, “Nuclear Synthesis of Interstellar 26Al”. In 2005, he visited USA twice and gave lectures in eight universities again. Inviting six astronomers of USA to give series lectures, he has hosted four consecutive terms summer school on gravitational wave astronomy. After the four summer school obvious effect, at least 20 young scholars in China in the field of gravitational wave astronomy specialized learning and research. 220 research papers by him have been published.

Abstract:

Magnetic monopoles may catalyze nucleon decay (RC effect) according to the particle physics. Using the RC effect, we proposed a model of a super-massive star with magnetic monopoles at the Galactic Center (instead of the black hole model) 30 years ago and three predictions in our papers of ApJL in 2001 have been quantitatively confirmed recent years: 1) a strong radial magnetic field near the GC is confirmed by the observation in 2013; 2) The emitting rate of the positrons from the GC is consistence with the observation in 2003; and 3) The spectrum peak of the thermal radiation is at 1013 Hz in the sub-mm wavelength regime is consistence with the observation in 2013. These are the astronomical observational evidences of magnetic monopoles. Besides, we have estimated the number of magnetic monopoles interior of stars and planets, which were captured from the space since the star formation. Based on the estimation and taking the RC effect as the energy source, we propose an unified model of supernova driven by magnetic monopoles, which may simply explain the core collapsed supernova: SNII, SNIb, SNIc and SLSN and the dark explosion of SN very well.

Maria Noemi Iacolina

INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Cagliari, Italy

Title: Long-term timing of the double pulsar J0737-3039 with XMM-Newton

Time : 12:05-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Noemi Iacolina has completed her PhD in the year 2010 at Cagliari University – Physics Department. She is doing her Postdoctoral studies at the INAF - Astronomical Observatory of Cagliari. At present, she is staff member of the Operation Team of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a 64 m radio antenna located in Italy. She is the PI of a project for the building of a radioastronomical receiver to be installed at the SRT, granted by the local government. She has developed a software package inspecting the source visibility for radio astronomical international facilities. Her scientific interests concern the multiwavelength studies of compact objects as pulsars, in particular she performed the long term X-ray timing of the only known double pulsar system.

Abstract:

The relativistic double neutron star binary PSR J0737-3039 shows clear evidences of orbital phase-dependent wind-companion interaction, both in radio and X-rays. In this work, we performed the timing analysis of 2006 and 2011 XMM-Newton large programs data. We detected pulsations from PSR J0737-3039A (PSR A) - with very high precision in measuring the spin period and PSR J07370-3039B (PSR B) despite its previous disappearance in radio. Interaction of PSR A's wind with PSR B's magnetosphere could have determinate the observed orbital pulsed flux and profile variations of PSR B as well as a loss of pulsar phase coherence on timescales of years. Evidence of orbital flux variability (∼7%) is observed for the first time, involving a bow-shock scenario between PSR A's wind and PSR B's magnetosphere.

Speaker
Biography:

Bryant Wyatt is a Professor of Mathematics at Tarleton State University. He is the Director of the University’s High Performance Computing Lab. The work presented here was done as a collaborative project between him and a group of students from the mathematics, computer science and physics departments.

Abstract:

The giant-impact hypothesis is the dominant theory as to how the Earth-Moon system was formed, but angular momentum concerns have cast a shadow on its validity. Computer generated impacts have been successful in producing virtual Earth-Moon systems that possess many of the properties of the observed system, but when tasked with addressing the isotopic similarities between the Earth and Moon they result in systems with excessive angular momentum. Evection resonance between the Moon and the Sun has been put forth as a means of removing the excess angular momentum, but this reasoning was rejected by the Royal Society at a special session called to discuss the origin of the Moon. Here we show how to use impactor spins to create an impact that preserves all the favorable aspects of previous simulations, and produces an Earth-Moon system with the correct angular momentum. Evection resonance is not needed. All the work is done on inexpensive NVIDIA GPUs, demonstrating how supercomputing and computational astrophysics has come to the masses.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-14:00 @ Waterfall Atrium

Xiaolei Zhang

George Mason University, USA

Title: Secular evolution of galaxies and the formation of Hubble sequence

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaolei Zhang has obtained her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1992. She was a Post-doctoral Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) from 1992-1995. She subsequently worked at the CfA as a Staff Scientist, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center as a Contractor, and at the US Naval Research Lab as a Civil Servant Astrophysicist. She took an early retirement in order to devote more time to her interests in the foundations of physics, in astrophysics, as well as in art. She is currently an Affiliate Faculty at the George Mason University, USA.        

Abstract:

Nearly a century ago, Edwin Hubble was among the first (including also Sir James Jeans) to notice a systematic trend of variation of galaxy properties along a morphological sequence, from highly flattened disky shapes to gradually more bulgy shapes, and onward to elliptical galaxies of varying ellipticity. It took the accumulation of observational evidence and the advance of theoretical understanding of the subsequent decades for us to learn that this morphological sequence, classified by Hubble in the eponymous Atlas edited by Sandage, was likely an evolutionary sequence, i.e., the so-called early-Hubble-types (bulgy or elliptical ones) are the results of the gradual central concentration of matter from the so-called late-Hubble-types (disky ones). Galaxies, thus evolve throughout the cosmic time along the (reverse) Hubble sequence from the late to the early Hubble types. In the past 25 years, the we have gradually established a dynamical framework, built on the foundation of the density wave theory of galaxies, which demonstrated how this so-called secular morphological evolution of galaxies along the Hubble sequence can be accomplished through the nonlinear and collective interaction of the galaxy-disk matter with the density-wave modes (these modes are the intrinsic global instabilities on the parent galaxy disks, and they give galaxies the striking appearance of grand-design spiral arms and bars). The analytical predictions have received extensive confirmation from observations and from N-body simulations. The result of this work has important implications on the cosmological evolution of galaxies.

Edwin Zong

Laser Neutrino Annihilation Synergistic Applicator LLC, USA

Title: Stellar sail, planet re-climate and homeland defense

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Edwin Zong has completed his Medical Degree from Shanghai University of Chinese Medicine and New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. He has completed his specialty training in Internal Medicine from KMC/University of California, Los Angeles. He is the Medical Director of Oasis Medical Group Inc., and Laser Neutrino Annihilation Synergistic Applicator LLC. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Mars’s weak electromagnetic field (E/M) is the reason why it has been losing its atmosphere/oxygen much faster than earth, observed by NASA study. Therefore, the first step for planet-flipping requires cosmos reconstructive engineering of its thin atmosphere (hostile to lives), which can be accomplished by growing its electromagnetic field. Such said approach isn’t a theory, it is a fact. The world’s electric production has almost tripled in the last century. Along with earth’s inherited motion, the electrification of our home planet has increased its E/M field, which causes global re-climate/gas retaining or warming. It is evidenced by the tremendous increase of the Earth’s lightning strikes and storms/clouds in the past twenty years. The E/M force follows Newton's third law, which is clearly supported by experiment as well. To utilize its force in cosmos, the author develops your budget trip and economic lodge/landing system with “aerospace stellar sail and electromagnetic topography establishment” or Asset E©℗. Asset E℗ will be the cosmos version of an affordable commercial airline and utility company. The Asset E℗ can be easily modified for asteroid mining/diverting and man-made flying objects (harmful) recycling. The code of cosmos conduct is expected to be an extension of earth’s practice. To ensure our home planet’s safety, I will discuss the necessity for globalizing a medical/humanitarian code-a version of 5150 in California, along with its physics for enforcing it.

Speaker
Biography:

Vasily Yu Belashov has done his PhD (Radiophysics) and Doctor of Science (Physics and Mathematics). His main fields of research are: Theory and numerical simulation of the dynamics of multi-dimensional nonlinear waves, solitons and vortex structures in plasmas and other dispersive media. Currently, he is a Professor at the Kazan Federal University. He was the Coordinator of Studies for the International Program “Solar Terminator” (1987-1992), and took part in Programs WITS/WAGS and STEP. He is author of 288 publications and one book “Solitary Waves in Dispersive Complex Media”.

Abstract:

We study analytically and numerically the dynamics and interaction of vortex structures in the continuum, and, specifically, in fluids and plasmas in two-dimensional approximation, when the Euler-type equations are applicable for modeling of vortex motion of inviscid fluid and guiding-center plasma. For numerical simulation we used the modified contour dynamic (CD) method. We fulfilled a number of the series of numerical simulations for study of two-vortex interaction, the interaction in the N-vortex systems, including interaction between the vortex structures and the dust particles, and also interaction of three-dimensional plane-rotating vortex structures within the framework of many-layer model of medium. We investigated the applications of the results obtained from dynamics of the vortex structures in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and plasma, for example: the problem of dynamics of evolution of the cyclonic type synoptic and ocean vortices which can be considered as a vorticity front, and also interaction in the vortex-dust particles system, and the dynamics of charged filaments which represent streams of charged particles in a uniform magnetic field in 2D model of plasma of Taylor-McNamara. The results obtained showed that for all cases in dependence on initial conditions two regimes of the interaction can be observed, namely: weak interaction with quasi-stationary evolution and active interaction with the "phase intermixing", when the evolution can lead to formation of complex forms of vorticity regions. The theoretical explanation of the effects, which we observed, is given on the basis of the generalized critical parameter introduced which determines qualitative character of interaction of vortices.

Leonid Ksanfomality

Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Title: Signs of hypothetic fauna and flora on Venus and their characterization

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Leonid Ksanfomality has completed his PhD from Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory in 1963 “The polarimetry of the Moon studied by means of an electronic technique”, and Postdoctoral studies on “The Venus thermal asymmetry” from Moscow Space Research Institute. He is the Main Researcher of Moscow Space Research Institute and the PI of 16 space experiments studying Venus, Mars and other Solar system bodies. He has published 4 books, more than 350 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of scientific journals. For the discovery of electrical activity of the atmosphere of Venus (1978), the IAU in 2000 named Xanthomalitia a small planet (asteroid 7394).

Abstract:

Transmission of TV images is a commonly used modern method in both space research of celestial bodies and the search for extraterrestrial life in the Solar system. In 1982, experiments in television photography instrumented by the Soviet VENERA-13 and VENERA-14 landers, returned panoramas of the Venus surface at the landing site. Over the past 34 years, no similar missions have been sent to Venus by any space agency, mainly due to the reason that the experiments were of extreme technical complexity. The archive data of the television experiment were reprocessed, which significantly improved the image definition quality. Analysis of treated VENERA panoramic images revealed objects that might indicate the presence of hypothetical forms of Venusian flora and fauna. Among them is ‘amisada’ that stands out with an unusual shape against the stone plates surrounding it. The ‘amisada’ can be included into the list of the most interesting findings of the hypothetical Venusian fauna. 'Stems' objects possess apparent terramorphic features of Earth-like floras. Among hypothetical flora entities of Venus, certain unusual findings that have similar structure were found in different areas of the planet. Their shape was repeated on various panoramas that were taken by different landers' cameras and have attracted researcher’s attention. Along with unknown forms, objects were found whose shapes resembled certain living forms of Earth. This phenomenon, i.e., similarity to Earth’s fauna and flora, was called terramorphism.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 15:40-16:00 @ Foyer

Irene Di Palma

Universitá di Roma La Sapienza, Italy

Title: Predictions of neutrino fluxes from Pulsar Wind Nebulae

Time : 16:00-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Irene Di Palma has completed her studies in Astrophysics from the University of Rome La Sapienza, a Fellowship at the Columbia University of New York and her PhD from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover. After the first Post-doctoral studies from the Max Planck in Golm, Berlin, she is now a Researcher at the University of Rome, La Sapienza. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.          

Abstract:

During the last years TeV emission has been detected from Pulsar wind nebulae. A new model by now has been developed explaining part of this emission by a hadronic component which consequently also predicts TeV neutrino emission. As galactic sources, many of the PWN are in direct view of the Antares neutrino telescope which can with its excellent angular resolution for several of the sources probe the emission, also considering the morphology of the sources. We use the IceCube non detection to put constraints on the fraction of TeV photons that might be contributed by hadrons and estimate the number of neutrino events that can be expected from these sources.

Speaker
Biography:

Manfred Cuntz has received his Doctorate degree from the University of Heidelberg, Germany. His research career included affiliations with the University of Colorado at Boulder, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Currently, he is a Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). His research involves solar and stellar astrophysics, extra-solar planets, and astrobiology. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving on numerous review panels with NASA and NSF.   

Abstract:

The search for life in the Universe is the fundamental topic of exobiology. The aim of my presentation is to comment on Galactic aspects as well as to explore which types of stars provide environments most consistent with exolife. Besides the sizes of the stellar habitable zones, we will also discuss the potential impact of energetic radiation (i.e., EUV and X-rays) on habitability. Finally, we will study the possibility of exolife for planets in multiple stellar systems, noting that in any of those systems the orbital stability of planets as well as the radiative environments deserves careful considerations.

Marcos Dracos

Université de Strasbourg, France

Title: ESSνSB - The ESS neutrino facility for CP violation discovery

Time : 17:50-18:15

Speaker
Biography:

Marcos Dracos obtained his PhD in 1987 with a thesis entitled, “Identification des Particules dans l'Expérience LEP-DELPHI, Étude Expérimentale de la Détection de Photoélectrons et de la Résolution sur l'angle Cerenkov avec le Prototype du Barrel RICH” at Université Louis Pasteur Strasbourg. He has been awarded the ADRERUS prize (Association pour le développement des relations entre l’économie et les universités d’Alsace) for his contribution to the research of new techniques in particle detection and identification. He was Assistant Professor between 1987 and 1988 at the University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg. He got a fellowship from CERN between 1990 and 1992. He is permanent Researcher in CNRS since 1988. He is currently Director of Research 1st class in Particle Physics at IPHC-IN2P3 in Strasbourg (France).

Abstract:

The comparatively large value of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 measured in 2012 by neutrino reactor experiments has opened the possibility to observe for the first time CP violation in the leptonic sector. The measured value of θ13 also privileges the 2nd oscillation maximum for the discovery of CP violation instead of the usually used 1st oscillation maximum. The sensitivity at the 2nd oscillation maximum is about three times higher than at the 1st oscillation maximum implying a significantly lower sensitivity to systematic errors. Measuring at the 2nd oscillation maximum necessitates a very intense neutrino beam with the appropriate energy. The world’s most intense pulsed spallation neutron source, the European Spallation Source, has a proton linac with 5 MW power and 2 GeV energy. This linac also has the potential to become the proton driver of the world’s most intense neutrino beam with very high potential for the discovery of neutrino CP violation. The physics performance of that neutrino super beam in conjunction with a megaton water Cherenkov neutrino detector installed ca. 1000 m down in a mine at a distance of about 500 km from ESS has been evaluated. In addition, the use of such a detector will make it possible to extent the physics program to proton-decay, atmospheric neutrinos and astrophysics searches. The ESS proton linac upgrade, the accumulator ring needed for proton pulse compression, the target station optimization and the physics potential are described. In addition to the production of neutrinos, this facility will also be a copious source of muons which could be used to feed a low energy nuSTORM facility, a future neutrino factory or a muon collider. The ESS linac, under construction, will reach full operation at 5 MW by 2023 after which the upgrades for the neutrino facility could start.