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2nd International Conference on Astrophysics and Particle Physics, will be organized around the theme “Current Findings and Future Prospects of Particle Physics & Astrophysics”

Particle Physics 2017 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Particle Physics 2017

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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With the development of rockets and the advances in electronics and other technologies in the 20th century, it became possible to send machines and animals and then people above Earth’s atmosphere into outer space. Well before technology made these achievements possible, however, space exploration had already captured the minds of many people, not only aircraft pilots and scientists but also writers and artists. In the 2000s, several plans for space exploration were announced; both government entities and the private sector have space exploration objectives. China has announced plans to have a 60-ton multi-module space station in orbit by 2020.

The NASA Authorization Act of 2010 provided a re-prioritized list of objectives for the American space program, as well as funding for the first priorities. NASA proposes to move forward with the development of the Space Launch System (SLS), which will be designed to carry the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, as well as important cargo, equipment, and science experiments to Earth's orbit and destinations beyond. Additionally, the SLS will serve as a back-up for commercial and international partner transportation services to the International Space Station. The SLS rocket will incorporate technological investments from the Space Shuttle program and the Constellation program in order to take advantage of proven hardware and reduce development and operations costs. The first developmental flight is targeted for the end of 2017.

  • Track 1-1Theoretical astrophysics
  • Track 1-2Quantum Astrophysics
  • Track 1-3Plasma astrophysics
  • Track 1-4Recent and Future Developments
  • Track 1-5Stellar Formation and Evolution
  • Track 1-6GNSS technologies

Modern particle physics research is focused on subatomic particles, including atomic constituents such as electrons, protons, and neutrons (protons and neutrons are composite particles called baryons, made of quarks), produced by radioactive and scattering processes, such as photons, neutrinos, and muons, as well as a wide range of exotic particles. Dynamics of particles is also governed by quantum mechanics; they exhibit wave–particle duality, displaying particle-like behaviour under certain experimental conditions and wave-like behaviour in others. In more technical terms, they are described by quantum state vectors in a Hilbert space, which is also treated in quantum field theory. Following the convention of particle physicists, the term elementary particle is applied to those particles that are, according to current understanding, presumed to be indivisible and not composed of other particles. Nuclear physics is the field of physics that studies the constituents and interactions of atomic nuclei. The most commonly known applications of nuclear physics are nuclear power generation and nuclear weapons technology, but the research has provided application in many fields, including those in nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, ion implantation in materials engineering, and radiocarbon dating in geology and archaeology.

  • Track 2-1Satellite Orbits: Models & Methods
  • Track 2-2String Theory
  • Track 2-3Elementary particles
  • Track 2-4Cosmic rays for particle and astroparticle physics
  • Track 2-5Statistical methods in particle physics experiments
  • Track 2-6Particle Physics Phenomenology

The visible universe-including Earth, the sun, other stars, and galaxies-is made of protons, neutrons, and electrons bundled together into atoms. Perhaps one of the most surprising discoveries of the 20th century was that this ordinary, or baryonic, matter makes up less than 5 percent of the mass of the universe. The rest of the universe appears to be made of a mysterious, invisible substance called dark matter (25 percent) and a force that repels gravity known as dark energy (70 percent). Scientists have a few ideas for what dark matter might be. One leading hypothesis is that dark matter consists of exotic particles that don't interact with normal matter or light but that still exert a gravitational pull. Dark energy is even more mysterious, and its discovery in the 1990s was a complete shock to scientists. Previously, physicists had assumed that the attractive force of gravity would slow down the expansion of the universe over time. But when two independent teams tried to measure the rate of deceleration, they found that the expansion was actually speeding up. One scientist likened the finding to throwing a set of keys up in the air expecting them to fall back down-only to see them fly straight up toward the ceiling.

  • Track 3-1Baryonic and Nonbaryonic Dark Matter
  • Track 3-2Cold dark matter, warm dark matter, hot dark matter and mixed dark matter
  • Track 3-3Effect of dark energy
  • Track 3-4Detection experiments

Atomic astronomy is the exploration of the atomic responses that fuel the Sun and different stars over the Universe furthermore make the assortment of nuclear cores and Understanding the hidden astrophysical procedures gives us pieces of information about starting point of the Earth and its creation; the development of life; the advancement of stars, worlds and the Universe itself; the cause of the components and their plenitudes; By distinguishing and dissecting emanations from stars, the dusty remainders from detonated stars and from reduced "dead" stars; By doing hypothetical counts on atomic conduct and its transaction with the stellar environment furthermore by planning research center examinations that investigate stellar atomic responses in the Big Bang, in stars and in supernova blasts.

  • Track 4-1Electromagnetic spectrum
  • Track 4-2Molecules and Photons – Spectroscopy and Collisions
  • Track 4-3Diatomic molecules
  • Track 4-4Lasers, light beams and light pulses
  • Track 4-5Optical BLOCH Equations

Gravitational physicists explore the implications of the general theory of relativity, in which gravitation is a consequence of the curvature of space and time. This curvature thus controls the motion of inertial objects. Modern research in gravitational physics includes studying applications of numerical relativity, black hole dynamics, sources of gravitational radiation, critical phenomena in gravitational collapse, the initial value problem of general relativity, and relativistic astrophysics. The works of Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein dominate the development of gravitational theory. Newton’s classical theory of gravitational force held sway from his Principia, published in 1687, until Einstein’s work in the early 20th century. Newton’s theory is sufficient even today for all but the most precise applications. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts only minute quantitative differences from the Newtonian theory except in a few special cases. The major significance of Einstein’s theory is its radical conceptual departure from classical theory and its implications for further growth in physical thought.

  • Track 5-1Newtons law of Universal Gravitation
  • Track 5-2Galaxy and Gravity
  • Track 5-3Gravitational waves
  • Track 5-4Gravitoelectromagnetism
  • Track 5-5Quantum Gravity Models
  • Track 5-6Other Relativistic Astrophysics

The visible universe-including Earth, the sun, other stars, and galaxies-is made of protons, neutrons, and electrons bundled together into atoms. Perhaps one of the most surprising discoveries of the 20th century was that this ordinary, or baryonic, matter makes up less than 5 percent of the mass of the universe. The rest of the universe appears to be made of a mysterious, invisible substance called dark matter (25 percent) and a force that repels gravity known as dark energy (70 percent). Scientists have a few ideas for what dark matter might be. One leading hypothesis is that dark matter consists of exotic particles that don't interact with normal matter or light but that still exert a gravitational pull. Dark energy is even more mysterious, and its discovery in the 1990s was a complete shock to scientists. Previously, physicists had assumed that the attractive force of gravity would slow down the expansion of the universe over time. But when two independent teams tried to measure the rate of deceleration, they found that the expansion was actually speeding up. One scientist likened the finding to throwing a set of keys up in the air expecting them to fall back down-only to see them fly straight up toward the ceiling.

  • Track 6-1Ancient astronomy
  • Track 6-2Big bang theory
  • Track 6-3Planetary science
  • Track 6-4Stellar astronomy
  • Track 6-5Forensic astronomy
  • Track 6-6Astrochemistry
  • Track 6-7Advanced software in astronomy

Our universe is both ancient and vast, and expanding out farther and faster every day. This accelerating universe, the dark energy that seems to be behind it and other puzzles like the exact nature of the Big Bang and the early evolution of the universe are among the great puzzles of cosmology. Dramatic advances in observational cosmology since the 1990s, including the cosmic microwave background, distant supernovae and galaxy redshift surveys, have led to the development of a standard model of cosmology. This model requires the universe to contain large amounts of dark matter and dark energy whose nature is currently not well understood, but the model gives detailed predictions that are in excellent agreement with many diverse observations.

  • Track 7-1Quantum Cosmology and Theoretical Cosmology
  • Track 7-2Formation and Interaction of Galaxies
  • Track 7-3Energy of the Cosmos
  • Track 7-4Particle Physics in Cosmology
  • Track 7-5Cosmic Microwave Background
  • Track 7-6Cosmochemistry

Optical telescopes are the most conspicuous, as they are fundamentally the same as those you use in your own particular lawn. Optical space science gives both the most amazing pictures we see and the most essential data we think about our nearby planetary group, the Milky Way, and every one of the systems encompassing us.

Optical space science is constrained by both the relative restriction of the optical range and the way that the Earth's own climate shut out and skips around some of this light, misshaping the picture we see. The human nearness is likewise an issue for optical seeing, as light contamination additionally extremely restrains the nature of information you can gather. Along these lines, observatories are typically situated in spots with a low rate of day by day overcast cover (less mists = additionally watching), far from towns and city (less light contamination = better watching), and ordinarily at high heights (less environment = less scrambling).

Given these confinements, space-based observatories, (for example, Hubble) will give clearer pictures, and better quality data about the items. In any case, putting a telescope in space is a troublesome, tedious and expensive practice. All things considered, a great deal of progressions in the field of optical cosmology have been centered around earthbound based observatories.

  • Track 8-1Optoelectronics
  • Track 8-2Optical Communication
  • Track 8-3Optical Metrology
  • Track 8-4Optical geometrics
  • Track 8-5Fibre optics components, equipment and systems

We are educated some further things about the cosmos beyond the solar system by sighting cosmic rays, which are mostly prepared of either atomic nuclei minus their orbiting electrons, or one of their basic components, protons. But these positively charged particles don’t point to their place of origin due to the magnetic fields of our galaxy which affect their flight paths like a magnet affects iron filings. The total number of elementary particles in the cosmos, and these neutral weakly interacting particles arisen to us almost without any trouble straight from their sources, traveling at very close to the speed of light. A with low energy of neutrino in flight would not notice a barrier of lead 50 light years thick. When we are able to see out in neutrino light we will undoubtedly get a amazing new view of the universe.

  • Track 9-1Neutrinos in the Universe
  • Track 9-2Stellar Neutrinos
  • Track 9-3High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos
  • Track 9-4Implications for the Fate of the Universe
  • Track 9-5Detection experiments

Nuclear astronomy is identified with execution nuclear material science estimations which will be utilized by space experts furthermore utilizes nuclear information to decipher cosmic perceptions. Nuclear material science assumes a pivotal part in astronomy and atomic astronomy is the exploration of the atomic responses that fuel the Sun and different stars over the Universe furthermore make the assortment of nuclear cores and Understanding the fundamental astrophysical procedures gives us signs about starting point of the Earth and its organization; the development of life; the advancement of stars, worlds and the Universe itself; the birthplace of the components and their plenitudes; By identifying and breaking down emanations from stars, the dusty leftovers from detonated stars and from smaller "dead" stars; By completing hypothetical estimations on atomic conduct and its interchange with the stellar environment furthermore by planning research center trials that investigate stellar atomic responses in the Big Bang, in stars and in supernova blasts.

  • Track 10-1Stellar Basics of Nuclear Astrophysics
  • Track 10-2Bing bang Nucleosynthesis
  • Track 10-3Hydrogen Burning Advanced Stellar
  • Track 10-4Low Energy Nuclear Physics
  • Track 10-5Evolution, Supernovae and Gamma-ray Bursters
  • Track 10-6Atomic Nucleus

Scientists are predicting a new age of astronomy with the discovery of the first sub-atomic neutrino particles from deep space, which could provide fresh insights into cosmic events in distant regions of the Universe such as exploding stars and black holes.

  • Track 11-1Meteorite and Comet Chemistry
  • Track 11-2Plantery Chemistry
  • Track 11-3Charged Particle Chemistry

Physics of the early Universe is at the boundary of astronomy and philosophy since we do not currently have a complete theory that unifies all the fundamental forces of Nature at the moment of Creation. In addition, there is no possibility of linking observation or experimentation of early Universe physics to our theories (i.e. it’s not possible to `build' another Universe). Our theories are rejected or accepted based on simplicity and aesthetic grounds, plus there power of prediction to later times, rather than an appeal to empirical results. This is a very difference way of doing science from previous centuries of research.

  • Track 12-1Astrometry
  • Track 12-2Spectroscopy
  • Track 12-3Kepler Telescope
  • Track 12-4Spitzer Space Telescope
  • Track 12-5James Webb Space Telescope
  • Track 12-6Telescopes in Space Advantages

Observational astronomy is one of the classifications of the astronomical science that is related with recording data, in contrast with Theoretical astrophysics, which is mainly concerned with finding out the measurable implications of physical models. It is the practice of observing celestial objects by using telescopes and other astronomical apparatus. Radio astronomy is the branch of Astronomy which studies celestial bodies at Radio Frequencies. Infrared astronomy is the division of astronomy and astrophysics that studies astronomical objects visible in infrared (IR) radiation only. Optical Astronomy is also called as Visible Light Astronomy. Ultraviolet astronomy is the observation of electromagnetic radiation at ultraviolet wavelengths similarly X-ray Astronomy uses X-rays and Gamma ray Astronomy uses Gamma rays

Sky surveys and mappings of the various wavelength bands of electromagnetic radiation have yielded much information on the content and character of the universe's structure. The organization of structure appears to follow as a hierarchical model with organization up to the scale of super clusters and filaments.

  • Track 13-1Computational Plasma Physics
  • Track 13-2Fusion Plasma
  • Track 13-3Particle Radiation
  • Track 13-4Superconducting Particle Detectors
  • Track 13-5Single-Particle Orbits

The Higgs boson is an elementary particle in the Standard Model of particle physics. It is the quantum excitation of the Higgs field

  • Track 14-1The Higgs System
  • Track 14-2Constraints on Higgs Boson Properties
  • Track 14-3Electroweak Baryogenesis
  • Track 14-4Producing the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson
  • Track 14-5Detecting the Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons

As of now, Space Missions are rocket investigating Mercury, Mars, Venus, and Saturn, and also a comet and an Asteroids and Life. The Voyager rockets are moving at fast out of our close planetary system while New Horizons speeds toward a 2015 experience with Pluto. Nearer to home, we have tests in lunar circle; a modest bunch of sunlight based material science missions, space telescopes, and a little armed force of Earth-watching satellites. In Earth circle, the International Space Station keeps on taking off around the planet with a constantly staffed team of space travellers and cosmonauts.

Correspondences Satellite is a fake satellite that transfers and enhances using a transponder, radio telecommunications signals, between a source and a recipient. Satellites communication is utilized for TV, phone, radio, web, and military applications. There are more than 2,000 correspondences satellites in Earth's circle, utilized by both private and government associations.

  • Track 15-1Space Missions
  • Track 15-2Earth Observation Satellites
  • Track 15-3Weather Satellites
  • Track 15-4Mobile Satellite Communication Networks
  • Track 15-5Satellite Orbits: Models and Methods
  • Track 15-6Space Weather
  • Track 15-7Satellite Radiance
  • Track 15-8Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM)
  • Track 15-9Satellite Navigation and Communication
  • Track 15-10Space explorations
  • Track 15-11Remote Sensing Satellites and GIS
  • Track 15-12Military Satellites

Atomic material science and Particle Physics is the zone of material science that reviews nuclear cores and their components and cooperations. The most usually known sort of atomic material science is atomic power era, the examination has hurry to tenders in many fields, including atomic medicine and attractive resonation imaging, atomic weapons, particle implantation in materials building, and radiocarbon dating in geography and archaic exploration.

  • Track 16-1Hadronic Femtoscopy
  • Track 16-2Charmonium Suppression
  • Track 16-3Sources of Relativistic and Ultrarelativistic Nuclei
  • Track 16-4Detection Technique
  • Track 16-5Fragmentation Process

In the high-vitality atomic material science we test that atomic matter is on the level of its crucial constituents, for example, quarks and gluons. The stage move between de limited quark-gluon matter, typical quark-gluon matter and ordinary atomic matter is called as Quark Gluon Plasma. In the high vitality impacts of overwhelming cores quarks and gluons are discharged from the hadronic limits of matter and along these lines the new condition of matter is framed which is likewise called as Quark-gluon plasma. The move from the hadronic matter where neutrons, protons and different hadrons are singular particles to the quark-gluon plasma stage which is a clear expectation to the hypothesis of solid associations. For the most part the high vitality impacts of overwhelming cores that is plasma which lives just for 10-22 sec since it returns to the hadronic stage when its quick development is chilled off.

 

  • Track 17-1High Energy Nuclear Physics
  • Track 17-2Collider Physics
  • Track 17-3Kinematics