Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Astrophysics and Particle Physics Dallas, Texas, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Masanori Iye

NAOJ, Japan

Keynote: Observational cosmology with thirty meter telescope

Time : 09:00-09:30

OMICS International Particle Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Masanori Iye photo
Biography:

Masanori Iye has done his PhD in Astronomy from University of Tokyo in 1978. He started his career as Research Associate in University of Tokyo and was promoted to an Associate Professor at Tokyo Astronomical Observatory of University of Tokyo in 1986. He became a Professor at National Astronomical Observatory in 1993 and retired in 2014. He is now serving for NAOJ as the Japan Representative of TMT International Observatory Governing Board. During his career, he has served as a Project Scientist to design and construct 8 m Subaru Telescope at Maunakea Hawaii and has developed a laser guide star adaptive optics system to enhance its vision. His group found a galaxy at 13 billion light years away in 2006 and identified the epoch of cosmic re-ionization. He was awarded the Japan Academy Prize (2013), Imperial Medal with Purple Ribbon (2011), Toray Science and Technology Prize (2011), Nishina Memorial Prize (2008) and many other honors.

Abstract:

Thirty meter telescope (TMT) 1 is a project to construct a next generation telescope with 30 m primary mirror and adaptive optics to enhance its vision to the diffraction limit. Currently, California Institute of Technology, University of California, ACURA (Canada), NAOJ (Japan), NAOC (China) and ITCC (India) are full members of the TMT International Observatory (TIO) founded in 2014.TMT is built around the legacies of segmented mirror technology of Keck telescope, Subaru Telescope 2-3 structure and control technology, and laser guide adaptive optics system to be developed by TMT consortium. Upon completion, TMT will have 13 times finer spatial resolution than the Hubble space telescope and 10 times larger light collecting power of Keck telescope. With this tremendous new power, astronomers are expecting to challenge various big questions. 1) To probe the first generation of stars and galaxies those were formed in the early Universe and elucidate the history of cosmic re-ionization and structure formation. Subaru Deep Field survey 4-6 was one of the successful predecessors in this field to spot galaxies at 13 billion light years away and witnessed the epoch of the last phase of cosmic re-ionization; 2) to study extra-solar planets 7 and probe their atmosphere to see if there is any evidence for bio-markers. Several exoplanets are already imaged by using adaptive optics and coronagraph technique on 8 m telescopes; and 3) to start monitoring the redshift variation of objects at various epochs to measure the cosmic expansion history. Though very challenging, this could provide a firm basis to study the nature of the dark energy, which is supposed to exist from supernova cosmology and from the analysis of microwave background radiation. I will talk on these topics using illustrative slides and videos.

Keynote Forum

Allan D Ernest

Charles Sturt University, Australia

Keynote: A quantum of darkness: The quantum origins of dark matter

Time : 09:30-10:15

OMICS International Particle Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Allan D Ernest photo
Biography:

Allan D Ernest has completed his PhD from the University of New England in 1991, working on theoretical and experimental aspects of photon-particle interactions in weakly ionized gases. His early Post-doctoral work was concerned with the control of excited state densities in plasmas using highly-tuned laser irradiation. More recently, he has been working in the area of Gravitational Quantum Astrophysics, studying the quantum-predicted properties of low-mass particles in deep-gravitational wells. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Physics at Charles Sturt University and has published more than 30 proceedings and journal articles.

Abstract:

Understanding the nature and origin of dark matter remains one of the greatest challenges facing modern astronomy and cosmology. The leading theoretical paradigm, Lambda cold dark matter (LCDM), works well on the largest scales but encounters significant issues on the cluster scale and below, and additionally requires the existence of an as-yet-undiscovered particle. Quantum theory however, could solve the dark matter problem entirely, without the need for new particles or new physics, and without compromising the previous successes of LCDM. Quantum analysis of the interaction properties of baryonic particles in ‘sloping’ gravity wells shows that photon-particle cross sections can vary, depending on particle environment and that, in large deep-gravity wells, these cross sections can be much less than currently accepted values. This purely quantum phenomenon provides an effective and unassailable solution to the dark matter problem within the LCDM framework. Additionally, a primordial formation scenario potentially enables an “all-baryonic” Universe to be observationally compliant with primordial nucleosynthesis ratios, galaxy distributions and microwave anisotropy observations, the pillars of observation that have previously required the need for a new “dark” particle. In this talk I will discuss the quantum solution to the dark matter problem.

  • Particle physics | Astroparticle Physics | Computational Astrophysics | Nuclear and Particle Physics | Darkmatter and Dark Energy
Location: Plano - Richardson (A)
Speaker

Chair

Amr Radi

Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Speaker

Co-Chair

Man Ho Chan

The Education University of Hong Kong, China

Speaker
Biography:

Bhaben Chandra Kalita has completed his PhD from Gauhati University in the field of Non Linear Plasma Waves. He is serving as Professor Emeritus at present in the Department of Mathematics, Gauhati University after retirement. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals like Physics of Fluids-B in brief communication, Physics of Plasmas, Astrophysics and Space Science, Journal of Plasma Physics, Physical Society of Japan, Communication in Theoretical Physics, Plasma Physics Reports, Journal of Mathematics-A Gen., etc.

Manabendra Deka has completed his PhD at the age of 45 years from Gauhati University, Assam, India. He has published the papers in reputed journal
Astrophysics and Space Science are (a) “Weakly Relativistic Solitary Waves in Multicomponent Plasmas With Electron Inertia”, Vol. 338,87-90, 2012,Springer, (b) “Investigation of Solitary Waves in Warm Plasma for Smaller Order Relativistic Effects with Variable Pressures and Inertia of Electrons”, Vol. 343, 609-614, 2013, Springer, (c) “Investigation of Ion Acoustic Solitons (IAS) in a Weakly Relativistic Magnetized Plasma”, Vol. 347, 109-117, 2013, Springer” and he haspresented the paper in “XXXI International Confer ence of Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG-2013) Granada, Spain.

Abstract:

The relativistic effects in electrons and ions particularly during magnetic storms and solar fluxes in outer and inner radiation belts, magnetospheric regions affect the linear behavior of the plasma modes faced by space probes/missions of any kind by the world community. Recently observed characteristic changes in space probes due to the presence of the charged dust particles and quantum effects in certain domain of wave phenomena are some additional causing factors of complexity. The fascinating well behaved nonlinear structure – ‘solitary waves’ found in space plasmas engulfing interplanetary regions are an interesting area of research. The regions of existence of these structures with variable pressures occurring usually in space subject to relativistic and quantum effects in plasmas/dusty plasmas under well-defined conditions may be helpful to deal with these complexities. Due to inclusion of relativistic effects in plasma particles, the usual condition for the formation of nonlinear solitary waves in warm plasmas necessitates to redefine or modify some entity. Our model: investigation of inertia of electrons demands an unusual result   because in usual plasma modes, isothermal ions are to satisfy and adiabatic electrons to satisfy i.e for high temperature Te. This inspires us to redefine Cs with relativistic effects which admit the feasible condition . In the second attempt of multi component dusty plasmas with quantum effects in the inertia less electrons, we have established a special method through a differential equation to deduce the ‘energy integral’ (which is usually not possible in general) to show the existence of the nonlinear solitary waves. A new quantum parameter C2 with defined range connecting the quantum term of the plasma wave equation is unearthed to predict the existence of solitary waves in dusty plasma.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:55-11:15 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Yuri Kharzeev has completed PhD in Physics & Mathematics in 1979 from Moscow Engineering and Physical Institute (State University, Moscow). He is Senior Researcher of Dzhlepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems. He has published more than 200 articles in referred journals. Themes of his articles are mainly associated with  Cherenkov and Scintillation counters, Mini-Drift Tubes (Jarocchi tubes) and e.a. which were used in the Experiments on High-Energy Physics in HYPERON (IHEP, Protvino), COMPASS-II(CERN),  D0-II (Fermilab)). He is a member of Mu2e Collaboration.

Abstract:

The scintillation detectors (SDs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPS) are one of the basic detectors in HEP experiments. The technologies of OPS production as bars (strips) and tiles, their optical and physical properties, light collection based on wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multi-pixel vacuum and silicon PMs are presented. SDs are multifunctional i.e. calorimeters, triggers, tracking, time-of-flight and veto-systems are examples of their field of applications. The use of SDs in many HEP experiments on the searching for quarks, new particles and H-bosons (D0, ATLAS and CMS), quark-gluon plasma (ALICE), CP-violation (LHCb and KLOE), ν-oscillation (MINOS and OPERA), and cosmic particles (AMS-2) are discussed. SDs still holds great promise for future HEP experiments due to such properties as high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection and multi-pixel silicon PMs.

Speaker
Biography:

Amr Radi has completed his PhD from Birmingham University and Post-doctoral studies from Aston University, UK. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute. His main research interests lie in the areas of Computational Physics. His research effort focuses on using the tools of computational physics to understand physics phenomena. The goal of his research is to understand particle physics via a combination of analytical theory and simulations/modeling.

Abstract:

This paper describes how to use gene expression programming (GEP) as an evolutionary computational optimization approach. GEP, as a machine learning technique is usually used for modeling physical phenomena by discovering a new function. In case of modeling the p–p interactions at large hadrons collider (LHC) experiments, GEP is used to simulate and predict the total cross-section, as a function of total center-of-mass from low to high energy √s, Considering the discovered function, trained on experimental data of particle data group shows a good match as compared with the other models. The predicted values of total cross section at √s = 8, 10 and 14 TeV are found to be 10, 105 and 111 mb, respectively. Moreover, those predicted values are in good agreement with those reported by Nakamura, Cudell and Block.

Speaker
Biography:

Toshikazu Ebisuzaki has completed his PhD from Graduate School of Physics, Univeristy of Tokyo. Since then, he has actively worked in the Astrophysics, Computational Science, and Earth Sciences and published more than 170 papers in reputed journals. He is the Chief Scientist of Computational Astrophysics Laboratory at RIKEN.

Abstract:

An accreting supermassive blackhole, the central engine of active galactic nucleus (AGN), is capable of exciting extreme amplitude Alfven waves whose wavelength (wave packet) size is characterized by its clumpiness. The ponderomotive force is driven by these Alfven waves propagating along the AGN (blazar) jet, and is capable of accelerating protons/nuclei to extreme energies beyond Zetta-electron volt (ZeV =1021 eV). Such acceleration is prompt, localized, and does not suffer from the multiple scattering/bending enveloped in the Fermi acceleration that causes excessive synchrotron radiation loss beyond 1019 eV. The ponderomotive accerelation was confirmed one-dimentional particle-in-cell simulations. The production rate of ZeV cosmic rays is found to be consistent with the observed gamma-ray luminosity function of blazars and their time variabilities, while the episodic phase of the acceleration and the spectral index may be explainable by the present theory. General relativisitic Magneto-hydrodynamics simulations show the intermittent eruptions of electro-magnetic waves from the innermost region of the accretiond disk around a black hole.

Man Ho Chan

The Education University of Hong Kong, China

Title: Sommerfeld enhancement of dark matter annihilation in galaxies and galaxy clusters

Time : 12:30-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Man Ho Chan has completed his PhD from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, China. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals. His major research area is Dark Matter Astrophysics.

Abstract:

In this presentation, I will discuss the possible consequences of the Sommerfeld enhancement of dark matter annihilation in galaxies. I will show that the Sommerfeld enhancement of the dark matter annihilation cross section via invisible sterile neutrino channel can give a sufficiently large annihilation rate to solve the core-cusp problem in astrophysics. We will also discuss if there is any possible signal of the Sommerfeld enhancement of dark matter annihilation based on the recent FermiLAT data.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-14:00 @ Waterfall Atrium
Speaker
Biography:

Juan Santiago Cortes is a PhD candidate from Universidad de los Andes, MSc in Physics from Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (2010), and BSc in Physics from Universidad Nacional de Colombia (2008). His main interests are: Effective field theories, Finite-temperature effects in low-energy QCD and phenomenology of particle physics.

Abstract:

We present some results that have been obtained in previous works regarding the large-N pion scattering phenomenology at both zero and finite temperature. This is fully attained when working with an O(N+1)/O(N) non-linear sigma model (NLSM) in the chiral limit (i.e., a large number of N massless pions) as an approach for low-energy QCD, and after introducing a thermal bath via the imaginary time formalism. At zero temperature, we fit the parameters of the NLSM to obtain an accurate description of the scattering data in the scalar channel and in this way, dynamically generate the f0(500) resonance, whose pole position (mass and decay width) is in good accordance with experimental determinations. After building up the pion scattering amplitude at non-zero temperature, we check that thermal unitarity holds exactly; thanks to this, we study the behavior with temperature of the resonance mentioned before and see how it is related with chiral symmetry restoration when a physical observable such as the scalar susceptibility is saturated by the f0(500) state. In this last case, we obtain a second-order phase transition result, something that is in accordance with lattice and theoretical analysis. Besides this, we find that the critical exponent associated with the susceptibility lies within the range expected for a four-dimensional O(N) universality class. Finally, we show some insights of our newest research interests, also related with phase transitions and QCD critical phenomena in this framework.

Nicolas A Pereyra

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA

Title: On the disk wind mass loss rates in QSOs

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Nicolas A Pereyra has received his PhD in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1997. He is currently an Associate Professor in Astrophysics in the Department of Physics at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV). He was a Research Assistant/Associate at Goddard Space Flight Center from 1993 to 1998. From 1999 to 2001, he was a Research Associate in Computational Physics at the Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela. From 2001 to 2005, he has worked as a Research Associate in Computational Astrophysics at the University of Pittsburgh. From 2005 to 2007, he has worked as a Computational Physicist at Prism Computational Sciences, Inc., at Madison, WI. Since 2007, he has been working as a Faculty at UTRGV. He has many publications in refereed journals as well as many presentations at national and international conferences.

Abstract:

We derive here a relatively simple expression for the total wind mass loss rates in QSOs within the accretion disk wind scenario. We show that the simple expression derived here for QSO disk wind mass loss rate is in very good agreement with the more “exact” values obtained through significantly more complex and detailed numerically intensive 2.5D time-dependent simulations. Additionally we show that for typical QSO parameters, the disk itself will be emitting mostly in the UV/optical spectrum, in turn implying that the X-ray emission from QSOs likely is produced through some physical mechanism acting at radii smaller than the inner disk radius (for a standard accretion disk, half of the initially gravitational potential energy of the accreting disk mass is emitted directly by the disk, while the other half “falls” closer towards the black hole than the inner disk radius). We also show that for typical QSO parameters, the disk itself is dominated by continuum radiation pressure (rather than thermal pressure), resulting in a “flat disk” (except for the innermost disk regions)

Wan-Zhe Feng

Northeastern University, USA

Title: Connecting LHCb flavor anomalies to astrophysics observations

Time : 14:50-15:15

Biography:

Wan-Zhe Feng has completed his PhD from Northeastern University and Post-doctoral studies from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Max-Planck-institute for Physics at Munich.

Abstract:

The LHCb collaboration has reported deviations from the standard model (SM) in b s`+` decays. These can be explained within U(1)0 gauge extensions of the SM, in which the corresponding Z0 gauge boson can mediate bs`+` transitions at tree level. In these models SM fermions carry family-dependent U(1)0 charges in order to generate the required flavor changing Z0 to quarks and lepton non-universality. We showed that such models can also accommodate a dark sector and the dark matter candidates can annihilate efficiently to produce the observed relic density. A big class of models to explain the flavor anomalies contains hypothetical particle leptoquarks. We correlate such models to the s-channel enhancement of neutrino-quark scattering in the very high energy shower events observed by the IceCube collaboration.

Speaker
Biography:

Gilbert Leon Joseph Beaudry started his present journey of unraveling the secrets of the Universe on February 4, 2004.  In January 2007, a descry observation in technology and latter in nature revealed a relationship between the requirements of observation and energy as being the missing piece of the puzzle needed to unlock many presently confusing unsolved mysteries of the Universe. The subject of his presentation on the recognition of energy spectrum observations beyond the thermal spectrum will allow for new theoretical developments with revolutionary changing clarity that will open up a new Universe. He presently blogs and promotes open science with public collaboration at PhysicsOfUniverse.com and as Astrophysics Research Channel on Google+ and YouTube.

Abstract:

It has been challenging to explain all the abnormalities seen in the processing of electromagnetic spectrum information from the Universe which is providing concepts, models, and explanations that produces controversies in many circles. It’s also generally agreed by the scientific community that there is a substantial lack of solid empirical evidence to support much of the ideals and speculations provided. Mysteries and abnormalities sometimes exist because of wrong reasoning that cannot resolve many problems. However, sometimes historically a new technology and/or a keen observation of a phenomenon swings a door wide open to create a scientific revolution with a fundamental shift, that gives us a clearer understanding of our Universe. The solid state physics of how the light emitting band-gap energy of a light emitting diode (LED) produces specific electromagnetic spectrum frequencies is a visual demonstration of a real relationship between energy levels and frequencies observed. Understanding the results from a LED laboratory experiment, combined with creditable scientific methodologies, and reasoning from natural occurring phenomena provide the missing keys to eliminate many abnormalities and problems, and to solve cosmic mysteries from the present mysterious universe. The phenomenon to be recognized in this science presentation is the recognition of the dualism of the electromagnetic spectrum. The dualism is, there exists not only the observation of thermal radiation as described by Planck’s black-body radiation, but also the mathematical induction observation of energy radiation, that radiates beyond the physical realm of thermal radiation. That energy radiation is observed in the Universe, to be quantized.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 15:40-16:00 @ Foyer

Qiuhe Peng

Nanjing University, China

Title: Error analysis of Ia supernova and query on cosmic dark energy

Time : 16:00-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Qiuhe Peng is mainly engaged in nuclear astrophysics, particle astrophysics and Galactic Astronomy research. In the field of Nuclear Astrophysics, his research project involved a neutron star (pulsar), the supernova explosion mechanism and the thermonuclear reaction inside the star, the synthesis of heavy elements and interstellar radioactive element such as the origin of celestial 26Al. In addition, through his lectures, he establishes Nuclear Astrophysics research in China, He was invited by Peking University, by Tsinghua University (both in Beijing and in Taiwan) and by nuclear physics institutes in Beijing, Shanghai, Lanzhou to give lectures on Nuclear Astrophysics for many times. He has participated in the international academic conferences over 40 times and he visited more than 20 countries. In 1994, he visited eight institutes in USA to give lectures. He is the first Chinese Astrophysicist to visit NASA and to give a lecture on the topic, “Nuclear Synthesis of Interstellar 26Al”. In 2005, he visited USA twice and gave lectures in eight universities again. Inviting six astronomers of USA to give series lectures, he has hosted four consecutive terms summer school on gravitational wave astronomy. After the four summer school obvious effect, at least 20 young scholars in China in the field of gravitational wave astronomy specialized learning and research. 220 research papers by him have been published.

Abstract:

Query on Accelerating Expansion of the Universe I: We have found some serious faults in error analysis of SNIa observations, which led to the idea of accelerating expansion of the Universe. Redoing the same error analysis of SNIa, by our idea, it is found that the average total observational error of SNIa is obviously greater than 0.55m, so we can’t decide whether the universe is accelerating expansion or not.

Query on Accelerating Expansion of the Universe II: Besides, we will discuss a possible reason of the departure from isotropy of the observed cosmic microwave background temperature.

Jian W U

Purple Mountain Observatory- CAS, China

Title: The DAMPE mission

Time : 16:25-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Jian W U has completed his PhD from the University of Science and Technology of China/ETHZ Switzerland and Post-doctoral studies from Syracuse University in the Department of Physics. Currently, he is a Professor at the Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The dark matter particle explorer (DAMPE) was launched into space on Dec.17, 2015 to a 500 km dawn-to-dusk sun-synchronous orbit aiming at detecting high energy electron (gamma) as well as cosmic heavy ions up to 10 TeV and 1 PeV, respectively for understanding the mechanisms of particle acceleration in  celestial sources and the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy, to probe the nature of dark matter, a form of matter necessary to account for gravitational effects observed in very large scale structures such as anomalies in the rotation of galaxies and the gravitational lensing of light by galaxy clusters that cannot be accounted for by the quantity of observed matter, and to study the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, active galaxy nuclei and other transients, etc. After months' commissioning, DAMPE has been in the observational mode. This paper reports the status of its detectors and latest results collected so far which will be discussed in the presentation.

  • Work Shop
Location: Plano - Richardson (A)
Speaker

Chair

Vasily Yu Belashov

Kazan Federal University, Russia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Igor Nasyrov

Kazan Federal University, Russia

Session Introduction

Vasily Yu Belashov

Kazan Federal University, Russia

Title: Nonlinear wave structures of soliton and vortex types in complex continuous media

Time : 16:50-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Vasily Yu Belashov has a PhD in Radio Physics and Doctor of Science in Physics and Mathematics. His main fields of research study are theory and numerical simulation of the dynamics of multi-dimensional nonlinear waves, solitons and vortex structures in plasmas and other dispersive media. Presently, he is Professor in the Kazan Federal University. He was a Coordinator of studies in the International Program “Solar Terminator” (1987-1992), and took part in Programs WITS/WAGS and STEP. He is author of 288 publications. Some of the main books he has authored and published are: “Solitary Waves in Dispersive Complex Media: Theory, Simulation, Applications” by Springer-Verlag GmbH, 2005; “The KP Equation and its Generalizations: Theory and Applications”.  Magadan, NEISRI FEB RAS, 1997.

Abstract:

Study of nonlinear wave structures of soliton and vortex types in complex continuous media (including space plasma, atmosphere and hydrosphere) is the important direction of modern nonlinear physics having numerous important applications. Such structures of various types can be observed in the Earth atmosphere and hydrosphere, in plasma of ionosphere and magnetosphere, as dust vortices on surfaces of the Earth and Mars, as dust sound solitons on the Moon, etc. At construction of dynamic models of continuous media the analytical and numerical methods of study of the equations of hydrodynamics and plasma physics are used. This allows considering numerous dynamical effects in real physical media, including thin dispersive ones, dissipation and instabilities of various type. Changes of media parameters are quite often accompanied by the bifurcation phenomena, such as a tornado and hurricanes in an atmosphere, shock waves and vortices in a plasma, etc. Association of efforts of researchers of nonlinear wave structures in complex continuous media and an exchange of opinions between them are rather important for the further development of this research area and can provide rather essential synergetic effect.

Speaker
Biography:

Igor Nasyrov received the MS degrees in Radiophysics and Electronics from the Kazan State University, Kazan, Russia, in 1990 and PhD degree in Physics from Kazan State University, Kazan, Russia, in 2000. From 1990 to 1994, he was a Research Fellow at the Department of Radio Waves Propagation and Diffraction, Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow region, Russia. From 1994 to 2001, he was a Scientific Worker at the Radiophysics Research Laboratory, the Kazan State University, Kazan, Russia. From 2001 to 2004, he was a Research Fellow with Radio Systems Research Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, United Kingdom. Since 2004, he has been Docent (Associate Professor, USA equivalent) with Chair of Radioelectronic, the Kazan State University (now the Kazan Federal University). He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals. He is a member of the Scientific Council of Russian Academy of Sciences on the complex problem "Radio Waves Propagation". His research interests include nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic radiation with substance, interaction of waves and flows, active experiments in space plasma, heating experiments on ionosphere.

Abstract:

Theoretically and numerically the generation and evolution of solitary IGW and TID at the front of the solar terminator for conditions close to real ones in the F-layer of the ionosphere was studied. In particular it is shown that under certain conditions in the morning and in the evening, sectors of the solar terminator front can generate the soliton-like "precursors" with periods of order 40-60 min. The results of the measurements of total electron content (TEC) at two spatial-separated experimental sites during the solar terminator passage in the evening hours are presented in this report. Parameters of TEC variations were obtained by dual frequency global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) diagnostics. Obtained good qualitative agreements between the theoretical and numerical modeling results are presented. At present, the fact of generation of the TID under the influence of the ionosphere by powerful radio emission of "Sura" facility is experimentally proved. In this case, the TID may travel over long distance (up to 1000 km) along and across the magnetic field lines of the Earth, but as it is well known, the development of artificial ionospheric irregularities including the large-scale irregularities in the field of powerful radio waves occurs along the geomagnetic field lines, i.e. along the geomagnetic longitude. However, the results of the experiments, obtained on network of GNSS-receivers situated at spatially separated sites along the geomagnetic latitude: Vasilsursk (56◦08′N, 46◦05′ E), Zelenodolsk (55◦52′N, 48◦33′E) and Kazan (55◦48′N, 49◦08′E), presented in this report allow to speak about development of large-scale ionospheric irregularities stimulated by powerful radio waves of “Sura” facility that can propagate along the geomagnetic latitude, i.e. across the magnetic field lines of the Earth. One possible mechanism to explain this phenomenon may be the one that is described below. In it shown that within the “Sura” facility main lobe a region of reduced electron density is formed, while outside this region the electron density is increased. Thereby, a sharp gradient of the electron density is formed on the border of the main lobe of “Sura” facility that may cause the generation of a solitary wave, as is discussed in. In this case, a solitary wave of the charged component of ionosphere may cause the generation of IGW that in turn can cause the formation of a TID. As it is well known, non-linear solitary waves can propagate over significant distances under certain conditions, and the Earth’s magnetic field does not affect the propagation of IGW.

Speaker
Biography:

Khatuna Chargazia is working at Institute of Applied Mathematics and MNodia Institute of Geophysics ofTbilisi State University. Her research interests are modeling of nonlinear waveprocesses in space plasma, numerical simulation of the physical nonlinear processes. She is involved in international scientific group with Professor Oleg Kharshiladze, working on analytical and numerical analysis of ionospheric and magnetospheric processes (turbulence, shear flows, BBF, etc.)

Abstract:

Near Earth space (ionosphere, magnetosphere) is characterized by complicated dynamics and for modeling of such processes, especially at conditions of external non-stationary impact (bow shock), it is very important for estimation of determined and stochastic parts of the dynamics, as well as the possibility of the generation of large scale wave and fractal structures. In this work, a physical model of the plasma perturbations for experimental data treatment and their physical and theoretical interpretation is obtained. In this model, a nonlinear mechanism of interaction of the perturbations with spatially inhomogeneous space flows is considered. Numerical simulation of formation of such large scale flows are carried out. Time series of velocity flow and magnetic field components of the magnetospheric flows observed by THEMIS satellite mission are studied by virtue of nonlinear methods. For numerical treatment of these data a recurrent diagram method is used, which is effective for short data series. Recurrence is a fundamental feature of the dissipative dynamical systems, which is used for analysis of relaxation processes in the magnetotail. The results of nonlinear analysis of plasma perturbations for interpretation are compared with the signals obtained by Lorentz and Weierstrass function. By virtue of recurrent diagram method, a fractal nature of experimental signals and dynamical chaos parameters. The results of satellite and numerical simulation data are compared.